Navigation Menu
Best Working Holiday Jobs in New Zealand

Best Working Holiday Jobs in New Zealand

By on Dec 12, 2016 in Blog | 0 comments

If you’re looking for some ideas for working holiday jobs in New Zealand, you’re in the right place. Below you will find my #1 rated job and why it’s so good. I’ll also let you in on a few handy tips about the job, too. Let’s dive straight in… New Zealand is a beautiful country with a massive range of landscapes to see and activities to do. You can walk on a glacier, kayak with seals, go snowboarding and even climb some mountains. The great thing is that the places aren’t that far apart. Compared to Australia, NZ is tiny. The North and South Islands In general, the south island is seen as the place to go and I would agree with that. For winter sports you have the most popular areas of Queenstown and Wanaka with 4 decent mountain ranges to choose from. Note: Don’t try and compare the snow of Canada, Japan and Europe to NZ as there is no comparison. The mountains are not high enough and do not get anywhere near as much snow in New Zealand. The south island has plenty to offer in the summer, too. Abel Tasman national park is a must see along with either the Fox or Franz Josef glaciers. Back to work… In terms of working holiday jobs, it really does depend on what you think is a good one. I worked for NZ Ski down in Queenstown for the winter season and also worked on a few diary farms. In Queenstown the pay was low (minimum wage), the cost of living was sky high and there was almost no accommodation available. You also spend a huge amount on going out and food. On the diary farm, I got free accommodation, had nothing to spend my money on and nowhere to spend it. I also worked a lot and got up early so it was easy to save money. On the Farm The diary farm was better pay, too. I earned $17 an hour. I paid nothing for accommodation, as is usually the case, or it is very cheap. Maybe $50 a month. I don’t know why it’s like this but I guess because they want their workers near to the farm. You have to...

Read More

Thoughts on India and Indian Culture

By on Aug 24, 2014 in Blog | 0 comments

While riding my Bullet across India, I had a lot of time to think about the experiences that I had and what India was like in terms of a country and its culture. I was in India for 4 months in total, with nearly 2 of those being in Goa which I don’t actually consider India because it’s like a tourist bubble which is not representative of how India actually is. Goa is to India like London is to England; geographically, economically and politically part of it but far removed from it in every other way. But that’s a story for another post. In this post I am going to write what I think about the country and culture, starting with the country first. It should be noted at this point that these are the conclusions I have drawn from my own experiences. I’m not saying that they are definitely right, wrong or factual. They are what I saw, heard, experienced and felt. Indian Chai I just wanted to put this out there but I think the only reason people love chai, not masala chai just normal chai, is because of how sweet it is. There, I said it. The Country & The Culture From the beautiful sandy beaches of Goa to the mountainous tea plantations of Munnar in the Western Ghats. From the wind swept plains in the barren south to the bustling cities of Kolkata, Hyderabad and Vijayawada; India is an undeniably beautiful, changing, busy and barren land, which has something for everyone. The Cities The cities are large, heavily populated places where millions of people live incredibly close to one another, vying for every inch of land both on the roads and in the home. People flock to the cities in search of a better life, or perhaps just a better paid job. Some are able to make a better life for themselves and their families, while others make a basic living which just about covers their expenses with little time for themselves to educate and fulfill any leisurely pursuits. The Countryside In the countryside, just mere kilometres outside of the cities, you will find many local Indian families living off the land like we have...

Read More
Rules of the Road – Riding a Motorbike in India

Rules of the Road – Riding a Motorbike in India

By on Jun 22, 2014 in Blog | 2 comments

Having ridden around India for 3 months and through Nepal for 1 month, covering over 10,000km in total, I feel like I have a reasonable amount of experience on the roads. I’ve ridden through large cities such as Delhi, Hyderabad and Varanassi and high up into the Himalayan Mountains through streams and across dirt roads. If you have ever ridden or driven a vehicle in any other part of the world before, that counts for nothing here. Buckle up, get a mask and be prepared to learn quickly how the Indians drive. You can read more about my journey here, my experience riding to an altitude of 3,800m here, crossing the Indian/Nepal border, about buying a Royal Enfield in India and about a Poker Run riding experience I joined. I wanted to share some of my experiences and give people a little insight into what they can expect to encounter on the roads so here are my…. Top 20 Rules to Survive the Roads of India #1 – Never assume that another road user will look out for you, it’s every Man for himself out there #2 – Always expect the unexpected, such as cows, goats, children, chickens and loads spilling out onto the road #3 – Be prepared to swerve at a moments notice, around 80% of other road users do not have wing mirrors and never look over their shoulder #4 – Understand that the larger your vehicle the higher your priority is on the road #5 – The cow is king of the road/World, never ever hit one… #6 – Do NOT stop for anyone, even the police unless you absolutely have to….Just ignore them and ride on! #7 – Always keep a small amount of cash (200 rupees) in a “bribe pocket” along with your license to be used if you need to get yourself out of trouble #8 – Never hand your license over the anyone, always hold onto it while showing the police #9 – Use your horn as much as possible to warn other drivers you are there #10 – Be prepared to pull off the road and onto the dirt when a truck or bus is overtaking while coming the other way, they will...

Read More
The Poker Run…

The Poker Run…

By on Jun 18, 2014 in Blog | 0 comments

When I was in Pokhara I heard about something called The Poker Run. I had never heard of it before but I am glad that I did. It was just what I wanted to do – a ride in a large group of motorbikes for the day followed by a party in the evening. It just so happened that it fell on the Nepali New Year of April 13th 2014 which would be New Year’s eve of the year 2070! The ride started in Kathmandu and made its way up to Pokhara, with some stops along the way. The name “Poker Run” is because at each stop you pick a playing card so by the end you have 5 cards and the that makes your poker hand. The best poker hand wins a prize. In total there were around 150 bikes on this ride so it was a massive group. Kathmandu It was an early start because I needed to meet some of the guys at a place called Handle Bar which is the base of a company called Sacred Summits who were organizing the event. After meeting we made our way down to Zero Engineering Garage in the city to meet everyone else and have some breakfast. The local politician was there who governed the area, too, and made a speech along with the event organisers. We had a police escort to take us through the city and out to the highway so that we could stay together as a group as much as possible. The Long Road It was a relaxed ride with some people going slow and others going fast so the group tended to spread out quite a lot but then regrouped each time that we stopped for a break. It was fun to go between the different groups and ride with smaller groups for a while at a time. I met a guy called Sonam and his girlfriend who I rode with and they used the Go Pro that I had recently bought to do some filming while I was riding so that was fun. A Loud Entrance About 2km outside of Pokhara we all met up again and waited for a Police escort...

Read More
India Compared to Thailand

India Compared to Thailand

By on Jun 4, 2014 in Blog | 0 comments

I had never been to Thailand until very recently, just a couple of week ago, so I only knew India and Nepal. I’ve been to both India and Nepal twice before and I just spent a further 4 months in India and 1 month in Nepal so I would say that I know them fairly well. I didn’t just stay in one place, either, I travelled around a lot, especially in India my motorbike covering around 9,000km. I’m writing this post because there are a few things that I have noticed immediately since coming to Thailand. Also, I imagine that a larger number of people will be doing it the other way round; visiting Thailand first and then India. This is mainly because Thailand is seen as an easier place to travel in and that is most definitely true. Words to Learn I found it really interesting when I compared the first words that I learned in Thai and Hindi. In Hindi I first learned how to say “Hello” followed by “How much is it?” and “That’s too expensive!” This shows a lot about what it was like in India. Everything had to be bargained for and things were always overly priced, especially for foreigners, but to be fair the same kind of negotiations went on between Indians. The first words I learned in Thai were “Hello”, “How are you?”, “Thank you” and “I’m fine”. This definitely sums up my experience of having been in Thailand so far. I’ve met lots of friendly people and the taxi drivers and people you meet in hotels and along the way are nowhere near as pushy as in India. They are definitely more friendly, but maybe that’s just a great tactic for getting you to buy from them and not negotiate on price! I don’t know, but it certainly feels more friendly here. Riding on the Roads Having ridden over 9,000km in India I felt confident that I could ride in Thailand, especially after seeing the road conditions in Thailand and the fact that people actually indicate and look before they manoeuvre. The first thing I noticed about the scooter that I had was the nearest button to my left hand was...

Read More
Journey Complete!

Journey Complete!

By on May 2, 2014 in Blog | 8 comments

Over the past 4 months I have been riding a Royal Enfield, 2006, Bullet Electra around India and Nepal. I bought the bike in Goa, India from an Australian couple who had ridden it down from Nepal. Funnily enough, the paperwork for the bike also showed that the bike was sold 3 years prior to that in Pokhara, Nepal which is the exact place and same company that I have asked to sell it for me this time. The Journey There were many good times and a few bad times while out on the road. I had one small crash which cost £6 to fix and I just had a couple of very small scratches on me so nothing major which was lucky – coincidentally, I was riding away from a place called Lucknow. In total I covered around 10,000km, which took me about 350 riding hours. I know, it’s slow but the roads in India and some in Nepal were not built for fast riding. Not to mention the fact that there are a bunch of obstacles on the roads, like goats, cattle, people, chickens and just about everything else you can...

Read More